Interview with Aaron Lockett

As the new football season approaches I decided to come with some new interviews.  This time around I’m interviewing guys that played football.  My first interview was with former Kansas State All-American Punt Returner/Wide Receiver Aaron Lockett.  Lockett was a standout athlete – in track, football, and basketball – at Booker T. Washington High School in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  From there he showcased his talents at Kansas State where he was a member of the football and track teams.  Lockett set many records during his time at K-State and in the 2000 Big 12 Championship Game he had the first return TD in the game’s history.  Aaron played five years professionally in the NFL and Canadian Football League. His brother Kevin was also a standout player at Kansas State and played in the NFL. Lockett’s nephew Tyler Lockett continued the family’s tradition of great Wide Receiver/Returner play while at Kansas State.  Lockett is currently a blossoming talent – First Team All-Pro and Pro Bowl as a rookie – in the NFL with the Seattle Seahawks. Check out the audio interview and a few of Aaron’s highlights from his time at Kansas State.

 

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Interview with Aaron Lockett

How We Love These…

I always felt that my first music blog would be about Freddie Gibbs but instead I’m here talking about one of music’s favorite and most controversial topics “Hoes”. Gibbs is probably my favorite rapper at the moment and he too has touched on the subject. I’m not focusing on him now though. Instead I look at the different ways male musicians love singing about hoes. Whether they’re bragging about them, chasing them, or trying to save them – one thing remains the same – dudes really love making songs about them. And I know many are thinking with the recent N.W.A movie that I’m talking solely about rap but nah the topic crosses into other genres. There have been years and years of songs about the topic.

My journey to this topic was very random. It started with me getting on Instagram and seeing this shirt on my TL.

nwa-the-police_fucknwa_t_sh

Interesting huh? Now if you have no idea who the 3 men on that shirt are then look up the group “The Police” and some guy named Sting. That should make the “Fuck N.W.A.” part funny (well at least it’s funny to me). So now I explain how The Police tie into this whole topic of singing about “hoes”. Well the group has a very popular song called Roxanne. Roxanne is a song about a prostitute “not having to put on the red light” anymore because well Sting was there to save the day. He gracefully sums it up with the following lines: “I loved you since I knew you – I wouldn’t talk down to you – I have to tell you just how I feel – I won’t share you with another boy”. Like I said it’s a great song and I think you should check it out below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXzFCS72QIA

This one here may come as a surprise to some but yeah here we go. A few years ago music mogul Diddy hit it big when he was able to help the vodka brand “Ciroc” expand in the United States. As part of helping the brand take off, Diddy released a great commercial featuring some of our favorite entertainers in it.  The group crashes Vegas and has a great night “breaking the bank”. The whole time there’s a classic song by Frank Sinatra playing in the background. The name of the song is “Luck Be A Lady”. Now on the surface the song appears to be very innocent and one wouldn’t think much of it. I mean you have a bunch of guys in Vegas gambling and a song about “Luck”. Well that was until I decided to actually “listen” to the song and not get caught up in the chorus and band. Boy was I cracking up after finally listening to the song. Somewhere in the Twitterverse there are a series of tweets of someone going on a rant about the song.

Frank did a very good job with the wordplay on this one. I mean the song starts off with an intro for the ages that ends with him stating, “so the best that I can do is pray”. Sinatra goes on to drop plenty of lines with double meanings. In the process Frank talks about “cuffing” this chick so things won’t get out of hand between him, the young lady, and some other guy. I’m sure those of you that are familiar with The Rat Pack have heard or read about the rumblings. I went years “hearing” this song and then a Ciroc commercial changed the way I heard it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJpGHR6ofus

The third and final song is a soulful ballad titled “Two Wrongs” by Mayer Hawthorne. This one doesn’t come with the same topics as above but shows how both parties can exhibit “whore-like” ways, as my wife likes to say.  “Two Wrongs” follows the classic cheating love song layout. There’s the beginning where Mayer acknowledges, “they say two wrongs don’t make a right” as many of us have often heard. He even states how “we all make bad decisions…that we make mistakes sometimes” – not quite sure why Mayer is bringing us in HIS mess – but when in “that moment” oh well! In the second verse he goes on to tell us the problem. He talks about how him and his secret lover can’t get caught up in some mess. Because well he has a woman and the lady that he’s sneaking around with has a man. He goes on to end the verse by talking about how the situation is so wrong but never says he’s not staying the night. The last word we hear from Mayer is “How”. This leads me to believe that he spent a night and then after it was all said and done, he could only ask – “How?” – in reference to his predicament.  This video will also help those of you wanting to brush up on your Spanish.

It’s amazing how the different songs we listen to carry so many meanings and messages. Some are plain as day and easy to decipher while others are written with double meanings. I enjoy the three songs I mentioned above and many others like them. Music is an art that is to be enjoyed and at times it’ll take us into a certain mood. There are some lanes that music ventures into that causes some people to question and protest lyrics. There have been claims that certain lyrics influence the decisions that a listener may make. Who knows? Some even say the lyrics are “dumbed down” now. Maybe they are but it seems to me that maybe we were never listening and only hearing to begin with.

How We Love These…